How to Cook Filet Mignon on The Grill, Oven, and Skillet (Easy Guide)

The way you cook steak dramatically depends on the cut you use. Because of its tenderness and flavor, filet mignon is always a popular choice of steak. It is best cooked on the grill. A pan-seared filet mignon is also excellent, and you can broil a filet mignon in the oven as well. Make sure your filet mignon steaks are cooked to perfection by using a meat thermometer! With our cooking instructions and video, you’ll get the tender and juicy steak you crave no matter what method you choose.

How is Filet Mignon Supposed to be Cooked?

There is nothing better than filet mignon. Its tenderness and flavor make it a favorite. It is usually cooked rare to medium-rare, which is the most tender and juicy. Cooking Filet Mignon on the grill is delicious, but pan-seared Filet Mignon is excellent; but for an exceptional flavor, broil Filet Mignon in the oven.

I recommend Omaha Steaks; master butchers trim each filet mignon steak twice, removing exterior fat to create a leaner, steakhouse-style experience. Every Omaha Steak is aged at least 30 days for maximum tenderness, and it is handled and delivered with care. 

Buy the most tender filet mignon in the world. One bite of an Omaha Steaks filet mignon, and you’ll know why THIS is the steak that made them famous.

How Long Do You Cook a Filet Mignon on Each Side? (Cooking Times)

Gas GrillCharcoal GrillSkilletBroil
Rare 1″5-7 mins5-7 mins5-7 mins7-10 mins
Rare 1-1/2″8-10 mins8-10 mins8-10 mins12-14 mins
Med-Rare 1″7-8 mins7-8 mins7-8 mins9-12 mins
Med-Rare 1-1/2″9-11 mins9-11 mins9-11 mins14-16 mins
Medium 1″8-9 mins8-9 mins8-9 mins10-13 mins
Medium 1-1/2″10-12 mins10-12 mins10-12 mins14-17 mins
Med-Well 1″9-10 mins9-10 mins9-10 mins11-14 mins
Med-Well 1-1/2″11-13 mins11-13 mins11-13 mins15-18 mins
  • RARE: Cook about 2 1/2 minutes on each side until internal temperature reaches 135° F (57°C). A rare steak feels like the base of the thumb when the thumb and index finger touch. Steak has a juicy texture; while muscle fibers have firmed and the color is pinker, much moisture persists.
  • MEDIUM-RARE: Cook for about 3 minutes on each side until the internal temperature reaches 145° F (63°C). A medium-rare steak has a similar texture to rare but is pinker and firmer, feeling like the thumb’s base when the thumb and middle finger touch.
  • MEDIUM: Cook for about 5 minutes on each side until the temperature reaches 160° F (71 °C), most of the proteins clump together, and the meat is light brown. Firm and moist, it feels like the base of the thumb when the thumb and ring finger touch.
  • WELLDONE: Cook for about 6 minutes on each side until internal temperature reaches 165° F (74°C); the steak is tougher, drier, and darker as more proteins coagulate and force moisture from cells. Steak feels like the base of the thumb when the thumb and little finger touch.

My favorite pan to cook a Steak is a 12-inch cast-iron skillet from the lodge; they come preseason as a grill pan or not. Try out perfectly grilled chicken breasts or grilling up some sweet summer peaches for a BBQ flavor. 

Easy Steps How To Grill Filet Mignon

  1. Thaw your steak entirely before cooking.
  2. Should bring meat to room temperature before serving to the group. It is served to the group. Remove the steak from the fridge for about 30 to 40 minutes before cooking it on the grill.
  3. Season steaks according to your preference; I recommend Montreal steak seasoning.
  4. For cooking on a charcoal grill, place the steaks over the hottest part of the grill and sear both sides for 1-2 minutes. Turn the steaks about 1 minute before the halfway point. In the chart below, you can keep grilling for the shown times. On medium, ash-covered coals.
  5. In the chart below, you can keep grilling for the shown times. The temperature to medium and keep grilling for the chart below. Turn around 1 minute before the halfway point.
  6. Grill one-inch steaks for 7-8 minutes and 1 1/2 inch steaks for 9-11 minutes, turning one minute before the halfway point. A meat thermometer should read 130°F.
  7. Before serving, cover your steaks lightly with foil and rest for 5 minutes. The meat temperature continues to rise about 5°F during this time (known as “carryover cooking”). The final temperature will be 135°F.
  8. When you slice into the steak right after it has been cooked, there will be a lot of tasty juices on your plate, not in your steak. This is because the heat of cooking pushes the juices toward the surface. The time to rest will let the juices flow to soak back into The meat, keeping it moist and tasty.

How to Cook Filet Mignon to Perfection in the Oven

  1. Make sure your steak is completely thawed before cooking.
  2. Should bring meat to room temperature. Take your steak out of the fridge 30-40 minutes before grilling.
  3. Set the oven to broil and preheat it for 10 minutes.
  4. I recommend Montreal steak seasoning for seasoning steaks.
  5. Place the steaks in a broiler pan on the rack. Position the pan so that the surface of the beef is 3 to 4 inches away from the heat. Broil to the desired doneness as indicated below.
  6. Broil the steak in the oven for 9 – 12 minutes for a 1-inch steak and 14-16 minutes for a 1 1/2-inch steak, turning it halfway through. A meat thermometer should read 130°F.
  7. Before serving, rest your steaks for five minutes, covered lightly with foil. During this time, the meat temperature will rise by up to 5°F (known as “carryover cooking”). The final temperature will be 135°F.
  8. These tasty juices will be on your plate rather than your steak if you slice into a steak immediately after cooking. This is because the heat of cooking pulls the juices to the surface. It will keep your steak moist and flavorful if you let it rest after cooking.

Steps to A Perfect Pan-Seared Filet Mignon

If you’ve ever wondered how to cook filet mignon in a pan on your stovetop, this method will give you excellent results, with a sear that will give your steaks a rich golden-brown color and enhanced flavor.

  1. Make sure your steak is completely thawed before cooking.
  2. Bring meat to room temperature by removing your steak from the refrigerator 30-40 minutes before grilling.
  3. A heavy nonstick skillet or cast-iron skillet should be heated over medium heat for about 5 minutes.
  4. I recommend Montreal steak seasoning for seasoning steaks.
  5. Steaks should be placed in a hot skillet (don’t overcrowd) but not covered, and no oil or water should be added.
  6. If you want a medium-rare steak, sear it in a skillet for 7-8 minutes for a 1-inch steak and 9-11 minutes for a 1 1/2-inch steak, turning it at about the halfway point. A meat thermometer should read 130°F.
  7. Cover your steaks lightly with foil and rest for 5 minutes before serving. The meat temperature will continue to rise for up to 5°F during this time (this is called “carryover cooking”). The final temperature will be 135°F.
  8. Additionally, you should rest the steak because cooking causes the juices in the meat to rise to the surface; if you slice into it immediately after cooking, those flavorful juices will end up on your plate, not in the steak. The juices will sink back into and throughout the meat by letting your steak rest, keeping it moist and flavorful.

How to Reverse Sear Filet Mignon Like a Professional Chef

  1. Preheat the oven to 275 °F. Place the steaks on a wire rack over a baking sheet.
  2. Place the baking sheet on the center rack of the hot oven. Cook until the internal temperature reaches 10°F below the desired final temperature.
  3. Cover lightly with foil and let the steaks rest for 5 minutes.
  4. Over high heat, preheat a heavy skillet or cast-iron skillet for about five minutes until very hot. The best sear comes from a hot skillet.
  5. Sear steaks for one minute on each side in butter or oil. A medium-rare steak should have an internal temperature of 135 °F, and a medium steak should have 145 °F.
  6. A sear will give your steaks the golden brown color and enhanced flavor usually associated with grilled steaks.
  7. Immediately serve as opposed to other cooking methods. Reverse searing does not draw the meat’s juices to the surface, so it does not require additional resting time.

John Siracusa

Cooking, for me, has always been an "art" infused with traditions. My career was inspired by Hell's Kitchen, the West Side of Manhattan, which boasts one of N.Y. City's best independent restaurant communities, along with Gordon Ramsay's no-nonsense approach towards always being your best.

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