Pan Seared Cast Iron Ribeye Steak

Gordon Ramsay cast iron ribeye steak is so tender, mouthwatering, and well-marbled, and in my opinion, ribeye is the king of all steak cuts. It’s become one of my favorite cuts of beef. Seared in oil with the skillet and basted in butter, then finished by melting a herb butter pat on top.

You will love everything about this ribeye steak recipe! The flavor is incredible, and the steak is cooked to perfection in 15 minutes for a medium-rare steak. Enjoy a tall glass of red wine. Bon appétit.

Learn how to cook a Gordon Ramsay pan seared steak oven recipe with the complete detail guide below. Now gather your equipment, and let’s start cooking.

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Equipment You Need To Make Gordon Ramsay Ribeye Steak in The Oven

  • Oven: For that succulent roasted steak, cook the filet mignon in the oven.
  • Skillet: This gives the steaks a slightly charred flavor when seared in a skillet. Place the skillet in the oven right away using a heat-proof one.
  • Cooking Thermometer: When monitoring the inside temperature of the meat, a cooking thermometer comes in handy. There’s no mistaking when a recipe has been cooked to perfection.

Gordon Ramsay’s Top 15 Kitchen Essentials

My favorite pan to cook a ribeye steak is a 12-inch cast iron skillet from the lodge; they come preseasoned as grill pans or not. Try perfectly grilled chicken breasts, or grill up some sweet summer peaches for a BBQ flavor. 

I’ve used and recommend both cookware sets, the ScanPan 10-Piece Cookware Set and the HexClad 7-Piece Hybrid; both are well-made pans with a solid, heavy bottom, heat fast, and they get the job done. Visit the ScanPan or HexClad on Amazon.

How do I cook the Perfect Steak?

While the perfect ribeye steak relies on individual taste, some essential guidelines and advice can help you hone your steak-making skills and make the most of your prime cut. Ensure the pan or grill is hot and follow the directions below, guiding the opposite for steaks up to 2 12 inches (4 cm) thick.

There is a common belief that searing steak quickly at a high temperature “seals” the outside of it into an impermeable, crisp crust that prevents moisture from escaping during cooking. The reverse is also true-the crust that forms when the steak is seared quickly at high heat and is not waterproof. Seared steaks dry out more quickly than ones that are not seared, as the high heat used to brown them dries out the interior more rapidly.

A seared brown crust makes for a considerably more savory steak, as the high heat triggers the Maillard reaction releasing myriad mouthwatering taste molecules.

Top Tips for Cooking Steaks

If you want your steak to taste great and to be as tender and flavorful as possible while cooking, remember to keep these tips in mind;

  1. Choose a thick cut with good marbling for a moist, flavorful steak.
  2. Dab with salt and pat dry 40 minutes before cooking for a perfect crispy finish.
  3. Sear on high heat for a delicious crust and a soft, juicy center.
  4. Flip your steaks frequently for even cooking.
  5. Rest the steak to ensure maximum juiciness.
  6. Finish offcuts thicker than 1/2 inch in the oven.
  7. If you want to add extra flavor to your steak, spoon butter over it during the final stages of cooking.
  8. Make your sauce in the same pan, so the gelatin thighs from the meat thicken it.

How Long To Leave Steak Out of Fridge Before Cooking?

All the professionals say to remove your steak from the fridge for about 20 minutes, bringing it to room temperature before preparing it, because a cold steak won’t cook.

Bring the meat to room temperature before searing seems most helpful in speeding up cooking. This makes little difference and could even pose a health hazard. In the center of a medium-thickness steak, it takes 2 hours to raise 41° F, and during this time, infection-causing bacteria may have formed on the surface.

Searing meat kills off bacteria on the surface but won’t kill all the toxins infused into the meat. When utilizing a thin skillet, the only time it is worth warming meat before cooking (but not to room temperature) is when using a thin skillet; a cold steak could drop the pan’s temperature to below the minimum 284° F (140°C) needed for browning.

How To Tell If Steak Is Ready With or Without Thermometer

A meat instant-read thermometer is the most reliable way to test meat, but you can also measure beef by color and texture. The finger test below, collectively with how the meat looks, helps you decide when the steak is ready for your desire.

RARE: Cook for 2 1/2 minutes on each side until the internal temperature reaches 135° F (57°C). A rare steak feels like the base of the thumb when the thumb and index finger touch. Steak has a juicy texture; while muscle fibers have firmed and the color is pinker, much moisture persists.

MEDIUM-RARE: Cook for about 3 minutes on each side until the internal temperature reaches 145° F (63°C). A medium-rare steak has a similar texture to rare but is pinker and firmer, feeling like the thumb’s base when the thumb and middle finger touch.

MEDIUM: Cook for about 5 minutes on each side until the temperature reaches 160° F (71 °C), most of the proteins clump together, and the meat is light brown. Firm and moist, it feels like the base of the thumb when the thumb and ring finger touch.

Welldone: Cook for about 6 minutes on each side until the internal temperature reaches 165° F (74°C); the steak is tougher, drier, and darker as more proteins coagulate and force moisture from cells. Steak feels like the base of the thumb when the thumb and little finger touch.

How To Cook A Steak In A Cast Iron Skillet With Butter In Oven

Step 1. Heat a 10-to-12-inch skillet and place the skillet in a 500°F oven. Remove the ribeye from the refrigerator, and bring it to room temperature.

Step 2. Once the oven reaches 500 °F, remove the skillet from the oven and place it on the stove over medium-high heat for 5 minutes. Lightly coat the steak with oil and season both sides with a large kosher salt and ground black pepper pinch.

Step 3. Instantly lay the rib eye in the center of the hot skillet. Sear for 30 seconds; don’t move the ribeye. Turn the ribeye over, and cook for an additional 2 minutes. (If you prefer medium-cooked steak, add a minute to each turn.) Turn over the steak with tongs and sear for 30 seconds, then place the skillet straight into the oven for 2 minutes.

Step 4. Place a pat of herb butter on top of the ribeye, take the steak out of the skillet, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes as the butter melts.

Pan Seared Cast Iron Ribeye Steak

4 from 134 votes
Servings

1

servings
Prep time

10

minutes
Cooking time

15

minutes

Gordon Ramsay’s Pan Seared Ribeye Steak

Ingredients

  • One bone-out ribeye steak, 1 .5-In. thick

  • 1 Tbsp. Canola oil to coat pan

  • Pinch Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste

  • Herb Butter

Directions

  • Heat a 10-to-12-inch cast-iron skillet in a 500°F oven. Remove the ribeye from the refrigerator, and bring it to room temperature.
  • Once the oven reaches 500°F, remove the skillet from the oven and place it on the stove over high heat for 5 minutes. Lightly coat the steak with oil and season both sides with a large salt and black pepper pinch.
  • Instantly place the ribeye in the center of the hot skillet. Sear for 30 seconds; don’t move the ribeye. Turn the ribeye over, and cook for an additional 2 minutes. (If you prefer medium-cooked steak, add a minute to each turn.) Turn over the steak with tongs and sear for 30 seconds, then place the skillet straight into the oven for 2 minutes.
  • Place a pat of herb butter on top of ribeye, remove steak out from skillet, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes as butter melts.

Recipe Video

Notes

  • Adapted from Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s Kitchen

John Siracusa

Cooking, for me, has always been an "art" infused with traditions. My career was inspired by Hell's Kitchen, the West Side of Manhattan, which boasts one of N.Y. City's best independent restaurant communities, along with Gordon Ramsay's no-nonsense approach towards always being your best.

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